• storytimeseedlings

A Wonderful New Year, No. 17

Updated: Jul 19

Note: This post originally published by Santa Clara County Library District Kids Blog, December 31, 2019


Photo by Thirdman from Pexels

A Wonderful New Year is upon us!

Time to start with the Storytime Seedlings Podcast, Episode 17.


For a wintery wonder (PDF) of fingerplays, songs and more - click here!


Books for a Wonderful New Year!




A Wonderful New Year - Fingerplays and Songs


Oh, Happy New Year (Tune: La Cucaracha!)


Oh, Happy New Year,

(Shake your hands like you're shaking maracas)

Oh, Happy New Year

It’s a brand new way to start

CHA CHA CHA! (Now do a little dance)

Oh, Happy New Year

Oh, Happy New Year

Everybody dance the part--

CHA CHA CHA!

Oh, Happy New Year,

Oh, Happy New Year

It’s a brand new way to start

CHA CHA CHA!

Oh, Happy New Year

Oh, Happy New Year

Everybody dance the part--

CHA CHA CHA!




Early Literacy Tip -- Oral Language Development in Children


Photo by George Pak from Pexels


Supporting our children's oral language is important to developing reading and comprehension skills. Blessings in the New Year! See you in storytime, Lauren


*Activities that support oral language development:


1. Read books that expose children to a varied and rich vocabulary through discussion of the pictures, text, and story development and sequence.

* Pose questions that ask the child to tell about what is happening in the story and in the pictures.


2. Talk with children.

* Extend discussions so that the child actively practices new language skills.

* Initiate interactive dialogues that use new vocabulary and concepts and work with sounds and letters.

* Show children how to ask questions (such as what, when, where, why, how, and who).

* Help children develop language for making comparisons (These feel soft, but these feel hard).


3. Go beyond building vocabulary to using vocabulary as a foundation for more complex skills such as grammatical knowledge, definitional vocabulary, and reading comprehension.

* Help the child develop a “deep” understanding of new vocabulary by selecting print that uses the new vocabulary in context, providing different meanings for the same word, using the same word in different kinds of sentences.


*Source: Early Beginnings EARLY LITERACY KNOWLEDGE AND INSTRUCTION, from US Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

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Hello! I'm Lauren Teixeira, (retired) Children's Librarian and Podcaster.

Find more podcast storytimes at: storytimeseedlings.com


You can also find episodes of the Storytime Seedlings Podcast through your favorite podcast site (Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Stitcher, Spotify, Listen Notes, iHeartRadio, Overcast, and TuneIn), subscribe today!

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